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Oregon Policy Profile

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Oregon

Teaching Standards and Leadership Standards

Teaching Standards

Is working with and meeting the needs of students with disabilities addressed in state teaching standards?

Oregon Model Core Teaching Standards align with InTASC Standards and have been adopted by the State Board of Education and the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission (TSPC). They serve as the foundation for teacher preparation, teacher licensure and teacher evaluation.

The Standards outline “what teachers should know and be able to do to help all students improve, grow and learn.” They are grouped into four domains of teaching: (A) The Learner and Learning, (B) Content, (C) Instructional Practice, and (D) Professional Responsibilities. They do not specifically address the learning needs of students with disabilities.

Standard #1: Learner Development states that “the teacher understands how learners grow and develop, recognizing that patterns of learning and development vary individually within and across the cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical areas, and designs and implements developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences.”

Standard #2: Learning Differences states “the teacher uses understanding of individual differences and diverse cultures and communities to ensure inclusive learning environments that enable each learner to meet high standards.” (See, 584-018-0105 – Knowledge, Skills, Abilities and Professional Dispositions for Initial I Teaching Licensure)

The Standards for Competent and Ethical Performance of Oregon Educators are the TSPC’s code of ethics and professional conduct. They do not specifically address any specific student subgroup’s unique learning needs, but they do articulate teacher competencies, and standards for ensuring the quality educational practices for all students.

Sources:

Oregon Model Core Teaching Standards

Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission, Standards for Competent and Ethical Performance of Oregon Educators

School Leadership Standards

Is knowledge of working with students with disabilities included in leader standards?

Oregon Educational Leadership/Administrator Standards align with the national ISLLC standards for school leaders. They do not specifically reference the needs of students with disabilities (nor do they reference any unique student class of learning needs).

The six domains for administrator professional practice are:

  1. Setting widely shared vision for learning,
  2. Developing a school culture and instructional program conducive to student learning and staff professional growth
  3. Ensuring effective management of the organization, operation, and resources for a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment
  4. Collaborating with faculty and community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources
  5. Acting with integrity, fairness, and in an ethical manner
  6. Understanding, responding to, and influencing the political, social, legal, and cultural context.

Standard #2: Instructional Improvement emphasizes “the success of every student” and Standard # 4: Inclusive Practices emphasizes “equitable outcomes” and “the success of every student.”

The Standards for Competent and Ethical Performance of Oregon Educators do not specifically address students with disabilities (or any unique student learning needs), but they do articulate educator competencies, including:

  • Skill in identifying and initiating any needed change that helps each student toward realization of personal learning potential; and
  • Skill in providing equal opportunity for all students and staff.

Sources:

Oregon Educational Leadership/Administrator Standards

Standards for Competent and Ethical Performance of Oregon Educators


Teacher and Principal Preparation

Teacher Preparation – Program Approval/Accreditation

Required course work in teaching students with disabilities/diverse learners

Oregon teacher preparation approval standards state that teacher candidates should “know and demonstrate the content knowledge pedagogical content knowledge and skill, pedagogical and professional knowledge and skills, and professional dispositions necessary to help all students learn. They also require each student teacher preparing for an Initial I Teaching License to assemble and analyze “two work samples to document the candidate’s ability to demonstrate knowledge, skills and professional dispositions.” Work samples include “instructional plans … that include differentiation of instruction for all students,” including students with exceptionalities. [OAR 584-017-1030].

Source: Oregon Administrative Rules 584-017-1015 and 584-017-1030

Clinical time in diverse settings/teaching special populations

Oregon teacher preparation approval standards include requirements for field experience and clinical practice. Through field experiences, candidates must develop and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to help all students learn.” The preparation program must evaluate the candidate’s “development and demonstration of knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions to help all students learn,” including students with exceptionalities.

Source: Oregon Administrative Rules 584-017-1038

Additionally, all educators seeking special education endorsement must complete a full program in compliance with the state’s special education standards for teacher licensure.

Source: Oregon Administrative Rules 584-018-0160

Finally, the TSPC has adopted a new specialization recognizing unique skills in working with students identified with Autism Spectrum Disorder. This specialization is a “gold star” on a special educator’s license that signifies specialty training and expertise working with children with these needs.

Source: Oregon Administrative Rules 584-066-0001 and 584-066-0010

Teacher Preparation – Accountability

Quality of teacher preparation programs

Oregon uses accreditation processes to provide “direction for programs, courses, teaching, candidate performance, scholarship, service, and unit accountability.” The state evaluates all educator preparation programs according to state standards for unit approval. Programs must have an assessment system that collects and analyzes data on applicant qualifications, candidate and graduate or program completer performance, and operations to evaluate and improve the performance of candidates and the overall program. Programs also must require initial teacher candidates to demonstrate “evidence of effectiveness to foster student learning,” primarily through two work samples.

Sources:

Oregon Administrative Rules 584-017-1008, -1022, -1030, -1032 and -1035

National Council on Teacher Quality, 2012 State Teacher Policy Yearbook: Improving Teacher Preparation in Oregon

Principal Preparation – Program Approval/Accreditation

Required course work in leading a school/district that serves students with disabilities/diverse learners

Oregon educator preparation approval standards state that candidates should “know and demonstrate the content knowledge pedagogical content knowledge and skill, pedagogical and professional knowledge and skills, and professional dispositions necessary to help all students learn. Assessments indicate that candidates meet professional, state and institutional standards.”

Source: Oregon Administrative Rules584-017-1015 and 584-017-1030

Principal Preparation – Accountability

Are programs reviewed based on outcomes of graduates’ success? Can school principals be linked back to institutions of higher education and preparation programs?

Oregon uses accreditation processes to provide “direction for programs, courses, teaching, candidate performance, scholarship, service, and unit accountability.” The state evaluates all educator preparation programs according to state standards for unit approval. Programs must have an assessment system that collects and analyzes data on applicant qualifications, candidate and graduate or program completer performance, and operations to evaluate and improve the performance of candidates and the overall program.

Source: Oregon Administrative Rules 584-017-1008, -1022, -1030, -1032 and -1035


Teacher and Principal Certification/Licensure

Teacher Certification/Licensure – Structure

Is a specific certificate, license or endorsement related to special education required?

All teacher licenses granted in Oregon require educators to have a special education endorsement in addition to the standard license. These licenses include:

1965-1999 Licensure: Basic Teaching and Standard Teaching (only for individuals who earned teaching certificates before 1999); and

1999-present: Initial I Teaching (a first-level license valid in a certain subject area and at specific grade levels); Initial II Teaching (a second-level license valid in a certain subject area and at specific grade levels); Continuing Teaching License (a third-level professional license valid in a certain subject area and at specific grade levels). [Note: Oregon is currently undergoing an entire licensure redesign effort seeking to move all educators onto one license and abolish the previously issued licenses, completion of this redesign is contingent upon Legislative and Gubernatorial approval.]

Oregon requires all educators seeking a special education licensure endorsement to complete a full program in compliance with the state’s 10 special education standards for teacher licensure: (1) Foundations; (2) Development and Characteristics of Learners; (3) Individual Learning Differences; (4) Instructional Strategies; (5) Learning Environments and Social Interactions; (6) Language; (7) Instructional Planning; (8) Assessment; (9) Professional and Ethical Practice; and (10) Collaboration.

Oregon also requires candidates for special education endorsements to demonstrate knowledge, skills, and competencies for at least two levels of teaching authorizations (early childhood, elementary, middle level, and high school).

The TSPC has adopted a new specialization recognizing unique skills in working with students identified with Autism Spectrum Disorder. This specialization is a “gold star” on a special educator’s license that signifies specialty training and expertise working with children with these needs.

Sources:

Oregon Administrative Rules 584-018-0135, 584-018-0160, 584-060-0062(7)

Oregon Administrative Rules 584-066-0001 and 584-066-0010

Teacher Certification – Examination

Does the state require teachers to pass a basic skills exam for initial certification? What are the pass rates on the exams? Does the state require Praxis II or more pedagogical assessment for licensure? Does it include anything about teaching diverse learners or special populations?

Teacher candidates must take a civil rights exam, a basic skills exam, and a subject mastery exam. Oregon uses Pearson NES tests for nearly all subject-matter areas. Candidates seeking licensure to teach special education are required to pass the Subject Matter – Special Education exam. An elementary subject-matter test is required for an elementary special education license. A secondary subject-matter test in at least one subject is required for a secondary special education license.

Source: Teacher Standards and Practices Commission, Testing

Teacher Certification/Licensure – Renewal Requirements

Is professional development around working with special populations required to move from initial to a professional license?

The state does not require specific professional development on working with special student populations to move from an initial to a professional license, but the state has adopted professional development standards that align with Learning Forward standards.

Sources:

Oregon Administrative Rule 584-090-1008

Teacher Standards and Practices Commission

Principal Certification/Licensure – Requirements

Is prior teaching experience required to become a principal and/or a superintendent? Is specific coursework or other evidence required around working with special populations?

Principal candidates must have three academic years of experience as a full-time licensed educator on any license appropriate for the assignment in a public school or regionally accredited private school and hold a master’s or higher degree in the arts and sciences, or an advanced degree. Candidates must also complete an approved administrator program and an initial graduate program in school administration at an approved institution. Other qualifications include a passing score on a test of knowledge of U.S. and Oregon civil rights laws at the conclusion of a course or workshop approved by the commission.

Sources:

Oregon Administrative Rules 584-080-0012 and 584-080-0022

Education Commission of the States, Administrator License Requirements, Portability, Waivers and Alternative Certification

George W. Bush Institute, Operating in the Dark


Teacher and Principal Induction

Teacher Induction

Is mentoring required for all new teachers and for how many years? If so, do program guidelines/requirements specifically address teaching diverse learners?

A 2007 state law established the Beginning Teacher and Administrator Mentoring Program, but school districts are not required to participate. The Program currently serves a fraction of the state’s new teachers, with funding awarded on a competitive basis. [Oregon Revised Statutes § 329.795]

Sources:

Review of State Policies on Teacher Induction (2012), New Teacher Center

Oregon Revised Statutes, Chapter 329

Principal Induction

Is coaching/mentoring required for all new principals/administrators/ superintendents and for how many years? If so, do program guidelines/requirements specifically serving diverse learners?

A 2007 state law established the Beginning Teacher and Administrator Mentoring Program, but school districts are not required to participate. The Program currently serves a fraction of the state’s new administrators, with funding awarded on a competitive basis. [Oregon Revised Statutes § 329.795]

Sources:

Review of State Policies on Teacher Induction (2012), New Teacher Center

Oregon Revised Statutes, Chapter 329


Teacher and Principal Professional Development Standards

Teacher Professional Development Standards

Does the state have professional development standards for teacher PD?

Oregon’s seven Standards for Professional Learning are aligned with Learning Forward’s professional learning standards. They prioritize “results for all students.”

Source: Oregon Administrative Rule 584-090-0110

Principal Professional Development Standards

Does the state have professional development standards for leadership PD?

Oregon’s seven Standards for Professional Learning are aligned with Learning Forward’s professional learning standards. They prioritize “results for all students.”

Source: Oregon Administrative Rule 584-090-0110